little girl removing or returning carry crate to its shelf

Every moment matters

Much of what occurs in a child’s day may seem trivial or monotonous from an adult’s perspective: going out, coming in; jacket on, jacket off; choosing a toy, putting it away… However, because children live intensely “in the moment”, it is precisely within the context of these seemingly ordinary routines that learning happens.


As early years educators we need to find ways to capture and celebrate the regular rituals in a child’s day and “turn the ordinary into the extraordinary”. To get started, try these ideas from Dr. Sandra Duncan: The power of everyday moments.

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children and adult sharing storybook on outlast benches outdoors

Encouraging literacy in children with SEN

A child's first experiences with books and stories, paper and crayons build the foundation for language, reading and writing.


“Teaching language and literacy via the use of books demands the highest quality teaching. This in turn requires knowledge, insight and curiosity about how children learn and develop alongside their unique interests and needs,” writes Kathryn Solly. Kathryn explains how children with SEN can become inspired about books and reading.

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nursery aged child playing with unit blocks and village vehicle

A solid foundation for STEM

For a five-year-old, the practical application of science, technology, engineering and maths is something they can only absorb through experience.

There is no better material to engage a child in STEM learning than unit blocks. In this new 3-minute video, Hal Melnick and other educators explain why every early years setting and school that is serious about STEM education needs to have a strong block play component in their curriculum. Watch now.

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two children building a structure with outlast blocks

Why we must return to kindergarten

Two centuries ago, Friedrich Froebel combined the German words for “children” and “garden” to illustrate his revolutionary approach to early childhood education – kindergarten. He envisioned a fertile environment where young children blossom and grow into creative, free-thinking individuals. Through meticulous observations he arrived at the conviction that a child’s natural play and exploration is the primary mode for learning.

Often, this “children’s garden” becomes the bottom rung on a pressure-packed, test-driven, educational ladder. How can play be restored to this important chapter of a child’s life? For some thoughts from US educators, read this article.

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Pete Moorhouse working with children

Memories that last

"You are told a lot about your education, but some beautiful, sacred memory, preserved since childhood, is perhaps the best education of all."
–Fyodor Dostoevsky 

Do you remember that teacher who was larger-than-life? A 'big person' who made the little person feel a bit less vulnerable and a lot more capable? Pete Moorhouse does this for children when he teaches them to use a hammer or a camera. 

Here's part of a recent conversation with Pete: What’s so good about wood?

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