Sensory

printing with paint and natural or other objects

Printing with found objects

Children love to explore and experiment with paint. Add some interesting objects from around the house or garden and the fun and potential are doubled! This is serious process art: the end product may be beautiful, but its all about the experience of new textures, messy hands, and discovery! Find out how to get started.

Happy Easter from the team at Community Playthings!
young child enjoying pretend play with mud

Encouraging mud play

Children plunge into messy play with great enthusiasm and no hesitation about getting dirty.The adults in their lives, however, may need a little more encouragement to understand the value of playing in and with mud.

Launching a mud area in your play space requires careful planning and communication with staff and families.This article offers advice on how to get over those hurdles.Then, let the fun begin! Read this.

young student playing at community playthings table

Building the best environment for children with SEN

All children deserve the best we can give them. Getting the learning environment right for children with special educational needs can be challenging, but we’re here to support you. Watch how this SEN school uses Community Playthings furniture and play equipment to welcome their students into a safe and calming place where learning happens naturally. View case study.

children playing with a sensory treasure basket

Sensory play for children with SEN

“A treasure basket is an example of a sensory-rich and highly portable resource, making it a perfect ‘sensory snack’,” writes Sue Gascoyne. “ The sensory stimulation and hands-on approach is great for brain and memory development, gross and fine motor skills and strength.” Because there are no right or wrong ways of playing, sensory play of this sort can appeal to children with varying learning styles and abilities. Read on.

children creating artwork

How to create appealing, beautiful and purposeful habitats

The bowerbird, a native of Australia and New Zealand, is a curator of its nest. What can we learn from the bowerbird about being a curator of children's creative work and building inspiring learning spaces that tell them: "You are important"? Read this from Dr Sandra Duncan.

Search or browse our learning library

Filter by topic or type