Science

little girl playing at the Mud kitchen

New for 2019: Outlast mud kitchens and Arbour!

In most settings, the home corner is a popular and firmly entrenched establishment. This spring take your cooking outdoors again, where natural materials, dirt and water are the perfect ingredients for hours of creative play and scientific discovery. And then escape the hustle and bustle to relax, read, or role play in a welcoming, protected den.

 

Watch our new Outlast mud kitchens and Arbour in action at Annan The Froebel School in East Sussex. Everything comes with our standard 10-year-warranty and free 2-week delivery.

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block play

Bring back the blocks!

For many young children, hands-on, sensory experiences with three-dimensional objects have been replaced by two-dimensional screens and worksheets. This is detrimental to their learning.

 

With all the evidence linking good spatial skills with future achievement in all STEM areas, we must find a way to bring back the blocks. “I am more convinced than ever that blocks are one of the most essential materials for the early childhood classroom,” writes Rosanne Regan Hansel. Read more.

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little boy sawing at the workbench accompanied by a practitioner

Working with wood in the early years

“Anyone who has witnessed young children tinkering away with tools in the woodworking area will know just how magical it can be,” writes Pete Moorhouse. However, despite the magic, many educators are afraid of the perceived risks involved in woodworking and the workbench has all but disappeared from many early years settings. Can this be remedied before we raise a generation of children who have never used a real tool in their life?

 

From his years of experience, Pete shares insights on the value of working with wood. The deep concentration, empowerment, and pride visible in the face of a child constructing with real tools will win over any sceptics. Read more.

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Outlast ramps

What happens when you add ramps?

"To myself I am only a child playing on the beach, while vast oceans of truth lie undiscovered before me.”
– Sir Isaac Newton

Rollercoasters, slides, water chutes, why are they so fun? Perhaps humans are programmed to experiment with gravity. There are Isaac Newtons in every nursery, waiting to discover (and be discovered).

Add Outlast ramps to your block set and see what happens.


Baby exploring

Babies are scientists

Science is about making and testing hypotheses. This is what infants do all the time! They are continually experimenting and asking “What if” in actions rather than words. The first time a baby knocks a cup from the highchair, it’s an accident. Next time, it’s on purpose to check if the falling cup will cause the same intriguing splash on the floor and the same exciting noise from mum!

As long as these little investigators are surrounded by interesting things and as long as they feel secure, they will continue to investigate and learn. Their active brains have a lot to process. No wonder they sleep so soundly at the end of the day.

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