Science

children in the woods on a nature walk

Helping children to explore nature's difficult questions

Children love to ask questions, and lots of them. They are naturally inquisitive about the world around them and delight in learning how it all works.

But how do we answer questions about topics such as death, or decay? How do we help children to understand our interconnectedness with the natural world, and about the grand cycle of life? Read these unique insights from Dr Claire Warden of Auchlone Nature Kindergarten in Scotland.

children looking at nature items through magnifying glass

Nurturing children's biophilia

Young children have an innate attraction to nature; they thrive on stomping in puddles after a rain, collecting acorns, and stroking a baby animal’s soft fur. This love for the natural world, if nurtured in the right way, can support positive environmental behaviours and social action as children grow up. Read this interesting article.

little girls playing with blocks

Learning through block play

Everyone knows that playing with blocks is essential to learning (and loads of fun, even for grown-ups). But what exactly do children learn as they line the blocks up, stack them, plan and build and bash them over? Harriet K. Cuffaro has some great insights into the value of block play. Read them.
little girl playing at the Mud kitchen

New for 2019: Outlast mud kitchens and Arbour!

In most settings, the home corner is a popular and firmly entrenched establishment. This spring take your cooking outdoors again, where natural materials, dirt and water are the perfect ingredients for hours of creative play and scientific discovery. And then escape the hustle and bustle to relax, read, or role play in a welcoming, protected den.

 

Watch our new Outlast mud kitchens and Arbour in action at Annan The Froebel School in East Sussex. Everything comes with our standard 10-year-warranty and free 2-week delivery.

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block play

Bring back the blocks!

For many young children, hands-on, sensory experiences with three-dimensional objects have been replaced by two-dimensional screens and worksheets. This is detrimental to their learning.

 

With all the evidence linking good spatial skills with future achievement in all STEM areas, we must find a way to bring back the blocks. “I am more convinced than ever that blocks are one of the most essential materials for the early childhood classroom,” writes Rosanne Regan Hansel. Read more.

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