Creative and messy

girl looking bored

Making room for creativity

Unstructured time gives children the opportunity to practice problem solving and to develop motivational and creative skills that they will need later in life. Adults need to resist the temptation to provide a constant barrage of stimulation and entertainment for children. It’s okay to be bored.

 

Is there time for constructive boredom in your classroom? Read the article.

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little boy sawing at the workbench accompanied by a practitioner

Working with wood in the early years

“Anyone who has witnessed young children tinkering away with tools in the woodworking area will know just how magical it can be,” writes Pete Moorhouse. However, despite the magic, many educators are afraid of the perceived risks involved in woodworking and the workbench has all but disappeared from many early years settings. Can this be remedied before we raise a generation of children who have never used a real tool in their life?

 

From his years of experience, Pete shares insights on the value of working with wood. The deep concentration, empowerment, and pride visible in the face of a child constructing with real tools will win over any sceptics. Read more.

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two children making mud pies on a table structure built of outlast blocks and planks

Celebrating mud

Children seem to be magnetically drawn to water and dirt. From their perspective, the activities that result in the messiest clothes are the activities which are the most fun!

“It’s okay for children to get dirty,” writes Michelle Rupiper. “In fact, when you look at the benefits children gain from mud play, it’s not just okay, it’s important.” Science now shows that certain bacteria present in soil are very beneficial to children and can aid in mental health and the prevention of allergies. In addition, the open-ended, malleable properties of mud make it an excellent learning material – encouraging the development of both cognitive and social skills. Read more

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P.S. International Mud Day is 29 June!

two reception aged children experimenting with water flow on the outlast cascade

The outdoor waterplay system

There’s something about manipulating the movement of water that is irresistible. Which child hasn’t discovered the thrill of sticking their thumb under a tap to create a dramatic and drenching spray of water? It is an opportunity to explore, experiment, and observe – science at its best!

Community Playthings set out to discover how we could enable every setting to provide this type of play – even in urban locations with limited outdoor space. Here, finally, we can show you our new Outlast water play system – operated by a group of industrious little engineers completely absorbed in their play and exploration. Get ready for a waterfall! Watch now.

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Woodworking

Woodwork at St. Werburgh's Nursery School

Liz Jenkins, Head teacher of St. Werburgh's Park Nursery School in Bristol, believes in giving her children varied opportunities for creative self-expression and exploration. In this interview, she tells how woodworking sessions with artist and educator Pete Moorhouse have added "another element of richness" to the setting.

Watch the interview and see more pictures of the setting here.     

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