Creative and messy

wrapping yarn around the fork

Kids at home?

In this time of unprecedented protocols and social distancing, many parents are looking for ways to occupy their children at home all day. Rather than turning to screens for an easy babysitter, there are many creative and educational activities that can keep children productively happy without fancy art supplies.

For example, with only some yarn and a fork you can make a host of pompom chicks to celebrate spring!

Stay well! All the best from Community Playthings

children playing with a treasure basket

Helping children manage their feelings

Early childhood is a busy time. Children are constantly testing limits and exploring boundaries, and learning an incredible amount along the way!

How can we support children in managing their feelings? Read this from Anni McTavish.

young child enjoying pretend play with mud

Encouraging mud play

Children plunge into messy play with great enthusiasm and no hesitation about getting dirty.The adults in their lives, however, may need a little more encouragement to understand the value of playing in and with mud.

Launching a mud area in your play space requires careful planning and communication with staff and families.This article offers advice on how to get over those hurdles.Then, let the fun begin! Read this.

two children checking a bird box for a nest

Building a curriculum on the natural curiosity of children

“Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.” – John Dewey

One of the greatest gifts teachers can give to their students is a life-long love of learning. Because children’s interests differ widely depending on their own experiences, meeting their learning needs demands the full and creative attention of a teacher’s mind and heart.

The Project Approach offers teachers a way to build their curriculum on the natural curiosity of children. When immersed in a topic that is local and relevant, students actively participate in the educational experience. This kind of authentic learning energises the child as they “become part of a community of investigators” instead of a passive recipient of information. Read more.

child touching polished stones and pebbles

The importance of sensory play

If there’s one thing in common about young children, it’s their ability to make a mess! Children learn best through direct experiences – exploring the world around them with their whole being. They stare, grab, smell, listen, rub, or lick unfamiliar objects, using all their senses to collect data that will be wired permanently into their memory.

 

If a child’s environment is too sterile or limited, they are deprived of this rich learning. What can parents and teachers do to offer diverse sensory experiences without becoming completely overwhelmed by the inevitable mess? Read this.

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