Child behaviour

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A creative approach to behaviour management

Four-year-old Jedekai was profoundly deaf and had limited mobility when he joined his nursery group. “What could I bring to the session that would really include him?” asked Anni McTavish, his teacher.

Within any group of children, there will always be a great range of different needs and behaviours. McTavish lists factors to consider in day-to-day management for all children, and offers pointers specifically around inclusion. “By injecting a sense of fun and a positive attitude into a situation,” she writes, “the learning is likely to be richer” and both the child and teacher end up winners.

Read more.

Child and teacher with mask

The language of caring

No one could have predicted the events that derailed everyone’s plans for 2020. Now, at the start of a new year, the future is still uncertain as we continue to adapt and respond on a daily basis to the volatile movement of a virus.

Fortunately, inspired educators can find learning in just about every circumstance – including the challenges of the last months. The prospect of wearing a mask whilst working with children has been a hurdle many have had to overcome. How can we share our emotions, empathy, and directions with the children in our care with a piece of cloth covering half our face?

Read Carol Garboden Murray’s surprising reflections and revelations on the expressive art of caring.

A teacher helping a crying child

Challenging behaviours in challenging times

Coping with change is difficult for any of us, and children are especially sensitive to disruptions in their routine. Covid-19 has successfully disrupted daily life for everyone. Constant change and the accompanying stress have become one of the new norms. Some children are returning to their nursery or school, while others remain at home.

“Those of us who work with young children know stress often translates into an uptick in challenging behaviours,” writes Jennifer Fiechtner. “Tantrums, meltdowns, sleep disruptions, and regression are all ways that children may show that they are having a hard time. So, what can parents and caregivers do to help?”

Read this.

baby crawling past the mirror in a baby shelf

What are the best toys to offer babies and toddlers?

What are the best kinds of toys to offer very young children? Which ones actually help them learn all the things they need to know? It can be really hard to choose from all the options, but bestselling author and early years specialist, Jennie Lindon, has some great tips to help you as you play and learn with your little ones. Read them here.

 
child and teacher sharing a story book

Building a foundation for literacy

A mother once approached Albert Einstein and asked him what she might do to prepare her young son for a successful career in science. “Read him fairytales,” he replied. “And, if you want him to be very intelligent, read him more fairytales.”

This is comforting advice for a nation-full of parents unexpectedly facing the responsibility of educating their children at home. Our predecessors understood that storytelling, singing and poetry provide a rich foundation in oral language which is a critical prerequisite for literacy. Read more about this from Joan Almon.
 

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