Parents and teachers

little girl looking at a piece of grass

Helpful tips as you reopen your setting

After nearly three months of temporary closure, many schools and settings are now reopening. As we begin to navigate yet another "new normal", early childhood educators will need to be more innovative than ever to balance the government guidelines with the age old issues of enrolment, staffing, and finances.

Here’s our Covid-19 update with helpful tips to support you as you reopen your setting.

 
three young boys playing next to a stream

Insights from Friedrich Froebel

Young children learn naturally when allowed to explore and discover, manipulate and practice newly acquired skills through play. Play is not trivial, it's children's tool for growth. Read this short piece by Dr Stella Louis and Dr Sacha Powell for some insights from the founder of the first kindergarten, Friedrich Froebel. 
two children playing with unit blocks

An interview with Daniel Spry

Blocks are one of very few resources that allow children to work in all areas of learning at once. They encourage creativity and allow kids to turn problems over, not only with their minds, but also with their hands.
Some months before the Covid-19 pandemic began, we interviewed Early Years Consultant Daniel Spry, who has delivered block play trainings nationally and internationally for many years. Here's the interview.
 
baby crawling past the mirror in a baby shelf

What are the best toys to offer babies and toddlers?

What are the best kinds of toys to offer very young children? Which ones actually help them learn all the things they need to know? It can be really hard to choose from all the options, but bestselling author and early years specialist, Jennie Lindon, has some great tips to help you as you play and learn with your little ones. Read them here.

 
child and teacher sharing a story book

Building a foundation for literacy

A mother once approached Albert Einstein and asked him what she might do to prepare her young son for a successful career in science. “Read him fairytales,” he replied. “And, if you want him to be very intelligent, read him more fairytales.”

This is comforting advice for a nation-full of parents unexpectedly facing the responsibility of educating their children at home. Our predecessors understood that storytelling, singing and poetry provide a rich foundation in oral language which is a critical prerequisite for literacy. Read more about this from Joan Almon.
 

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