Early years

resetting_pandemic_screen_time_blog

How can we reset screen time after the pandemic?

Over the past year, screens have been a saving grace for many of us. They’ve connected us with loved ones, enabled us to work from home, and allowed our children to continue participating in school or nursery.

But as the pandemic slowly begins to retreat, and restrictions gradually lift, we need to start thinking about how to put screens back in their proper place. Our gut reaction tells us that too much screen time is bad for kids, depriving them of opportunities for free play, social interactions, eye contact, and direct response from caring adults.

After this year of unnatural dependence on screens, it may be hard to get back to what we know is best for our children. Jean Rogers, of the Children’s Screen Time Action Network, offers some positive suggestions for parents and educators for the months ahead. Read the whole article here.

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A creative approach to behaviour management

Four-year-old Jedekai was profoundly deaf and had limited mobility when he joined his nursery group. “What could I bring to the session that would really include him?” asked Anni McTavish, his teacher.

Within any group of children, there will always be a great range of different needs and behaviours. McTavish lists factors to consider in day-to-day management for all children, and offers pointers specifically around inclusion. “By injecting a sense of fun and a positive attitude into a situation,” she writes, “the learning is likely to be richer” and both the child and teacher end up winners.

Read more.

Child and teacher with mask

The language of caring

No one could have predicted the events that derailed everyone’s plans for 2020. Now, at the start of a new year, the future is still uncertain as we continue to adapt and respond on a daily basis to the volatile movement of a virus.

Fortunately, inspired educators can find learning in just about every circumstance – including the challenges of the last months. The prospect of wearing a mask whilst working with children has been a hurdle many have had to overcome. How can we share our emotions, empathy, and directions with the children in our care with a piece of cloth covering half our face?

Read Carol Garboden Murray’s surprising reflections and revelations on the expressive art of caring.

Two children hugging and laughing

Inspiration for a new year

As we head into a new year, we still find ourselves coping with difficult circumstances and hoping for better times. In strained conditions that have the potential to discourage us, what is most crucial as we continue to care for children? Valuing each child as an individual who is unique, precious and unlike any other is foundational. As an educator, carer or parent, you have the power to change lives for the better, in fact to impact the world and make it “worthy of its children”.

Watch this video to hear these words by the musician Pablo Casals, and let them inspire you for the future.

Best wishes for a new year!

child looking at candle

Honouring children

What’s most important about celebrating Christmas with children? Alice Sharp takes us through her own memories to point out the key qualities that make a true Christmas. In her usual lively style, Alice offers uplifting and hopeful thoughts at a time when we all need to hear them.

Read her article and find out about her upcoming webinar.

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